HomeHome  |   Undergraduate CatalogUndergraduate Catalog  |   Graduate CatalogGraduate Catalog  |   Past CatalogsPast Catalogs  |   SXU HomeSXU Home    

Department of English and Foreign Languages Courses

English

ENGL 100:  Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing (3)
Offered in fall semester
An elective course designed for students who require additional practice in developing their skills in academic writing and rhetorical analysis.

ENGL 120: Rhetoric and Writing (3)
Offered each semester
English 120 introduces students to the theories and practices of academic writing. Students' will demonstrate rhetorical sensitivity in reading and writing, compose inquiry-based arguments and perform writing as a process.  Must be passed with a grade of C or better. 

ENGL 154: Introduction to Literature (3)
Offered each semester
Close reading and analysis of poetry, fiction and/or drama selections leading to a better understanding of how literature works and what it can do. Open to all students and designed for students who are not English majors.

ENGL 155: Introduction to Literature: Global (3)
Close reading and analysis of poetry, fiction and/or drama selections chosen from the literatures of the world, excluding American, leading to a better understanding of how different cultures think of the ways literature works and what it can do. Designed to satisfy the General Education Level II Literature and Global Studies requirements. Open to all students and designed for students who are not English majors.

ENGL 157: Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
Offered in fall semester
An introduction to Shakespeare through the reading of several major plays. Open to all students and designed for students who are not English majors.

ENGL 160: Special Topics in Literature (1-3)
Offered as staffing and scheduling allows
Studies of topics of an introductory nature not regularly included in other departmental offerings and designed for students who are not English majors. Open to all students.

ENGL 201: English Literature to 1700 (3)
Offered in fall semester
A survey of English literature from the Old English period to the end of the 17th-century.

ENGL 202: English Literature Since 1700 (3)
Offered in spring semester
A survey of English literature from the 18th-century to the present.

ENGL 203: American Literature to 1865 (3)
Offered in fall semester
A survey of American literature from the explorers' narratives to the Civil War.

ENGL 204: American Literature Since 1865 (3)
Offered in spring semester
A survey of American literature from the post-Civil War era to the present.

ENGL 207: The Study of Literature (3)
Offered each semester
Introduction to the study of literature through a range of contemporary (1965-present) theoretical perspectives. Required of English majors and minors but also open to other interested students with strong backgrounds in the study of literature. Should be taken as soon as possible by English majors and minors.

ENGL 210: Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
Introduction to writing poetry and short fiction. Students will compose several poems and at least one short story in the context of reading classic and contemporary literature.

ENGL 222: Greek Drama (3)
Introduction to classical Greek drama through the reading of several plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes within their literary, historical and social contexts.

ENGL 230: Multiethnic Literatures in the United States (3)
An introduction to major works and issues of contemporary multiethnic literature in the United States, primarily works by African-American, Asian-American, Latino and Native American writers.

ENGL 233: Middle Eastern Literature (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the Middle Eastern Studies Program
Selected poems, short stories, sacred texts, and novels written by authors from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds from different regions of the Middle East will be studied in their historical and cultural contexts. Special attention will be devoted to closely analyzing the diverse perspectives in the literature. Discussions will revolve around the interpretation of literary motifs, religious beliefs, day to day lived struggles and experiences, and challenges to adapting to cultural changes, which may occur from immigration, exile or exposure to other cultures.

ENGL 235: Literature and Sports (3)
Reading and analysis of sports classics in poetry, fiction, drama and personal-experience writing. Focus on the sporting experience as a metaphor for life and on the various ways that sports events are transformed into literature.

ENGL 240: Women and Literature (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies Program
Offered in spring semester
A study of women's writing in all genres and from a wide range of historical contexts and ethnic groups.

ENGL 241: Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3)
Offered in spring semester
An introduction to the study of language and modern linguistics. The nature of oral and written language; language structure; grammars; semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology; the evolution of the English language; language diversity; the impact of cultural, economic, political and social environment on language. Designed as an introductory course both for future teachers of English language arts and for students seeking an introduction to language and how it works.

ENGL 260: Special Topics in Literature (1-3)

Offered as staffing and scheduling allow
Studies of topics designed as electives for majors, and for students who are not majors. Open to all students.

ENGL 300: Medieval English Literature (3)
A study of English literature (lyrics, romances and plays), excluding Chaucer, from the 6th through the 15th-centuries.

ENGL 301: Chaucer (3)
A study of Chaucer's poetry, primarily The Canterbury Tales, in the context of late-medieval culture and language.

ENGL 302: English Renaissance Literature (3)
A study of English literature of the 16th and 17th-centuries in the context of Renaissance culture and society.

ENGL 303: English Renaissance Drama (3)
A study of plays by Shakespeare's contemporary dramatists, major and minor, in the context of Renaissance theater and society.

ENGL 304: Shakespeare (3)
Offered in fall semester
A study of selected major comedies, histories and tragedies, including the development of Shakespeare's career in relation to his theater and society.

ENGL 310: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature (3)
A study of the different genres of English literature in relation to British politics, culture and society from 1660 to 1800.

ENGL 311: English Literature of the Romantic Period (3)
A study of the different genres of English romanticism as a literary movement in its cultural and social context.

ENGL 313: Twentieth-Century British Literature (3)
A study of the different literary movements and genres in relation to 20th-century British culture and society.

ENGL 315: The English Novel (3)
A study of the historical development of the English novel as an art form, from its inception to the present.

ENGL 317: English Literature of the Victorian Period (3)
A study of the literature of the Victorian age in its cultural and social context.

ENGL 321: Literature of the American Romantic Period (3)
A study of antebellum American literature that examines the cultural, intellectual and literary engagements with romanticism and transcendentalism.

ENGL 322: American Regionalism and Realism (3)
A study of post-bellum American literature that examines realism and naturalism in the context of Social Darwinism, populism and progressivism.

ENGL 323: American Modernism (3)
A study of American modernism that examines the movement's literary experimentation and engagements with American culture.

ENGL 325: American Fiction (3)
A study of the rise of the American novel and/or short fiction.

ENGL 327: The Writing of the American South (3)
A study of the literature of the region and its related issues of myth, locale and race.

ENGL 328: Early American Literature (3)
A study of early American literature that examines early narrative forms and the rise of the republic in a cultural context.

ENGL 330: Folklore (3)
Cross Ref: ANTH 330
Introduction to the study of the folklore of the major areas of the world, concentrating on the study of the folktale.

ENGL 331: Issues in African-American Literature (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies Program
A study of African-American literature and its related issues of authority, self and canon.

ENGL 332: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies (3)
Cross Ref: HUM 232. This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies Program
Offered annually (not necessarily within this department)
This course addresses the relationship between biological sex and the construction of gendered identities. As a result, this course deals directly with this relationship, as well as the historical conditions that give rise to this relationship, by examining writings about women and men and femininity and masculinity, from a range of disciplines that include the cultural, the sociological and the anthropological.

ENGL 333: Modern African Literature (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the African American Studies Program
Selected works by modern African writers within their historical and cultural contexts. Satisfies the teacher certification requirement in non-Western and Third World cultures.

ENGL 334: Film as Text (3)
Cross Ref: HUM 334
A study of the vocabulary and concepts of cinematic form and of the fundamentals of critical writing about film.

ENGL 336: Native American Literature (3)
Selected works by modern Native American writers within their historical and cultural contexts.

ENGL 340: Literary Criticism (3)
Prerequisite: Junior standing as an English major or consent of instructor
Selected texts in literary theory, ancient and modern, with a strong emphasis on contemporary theories. Strongly recommended for English majors planning to attend graduate school.

ENGL 342: History of the English Language (3)
A sociolinguistic study of the development of English from its Germanic roots to its current state as a global language.

ENGL 345: Modern Drama (3)
A study of drama from the late 19th-century to the present.

ENGL 347: World Literature to 1500 (3)
Offered in fall semester
Selected works from a wide range of world literatures from the earliest written texts through about 1500: Ancient Middle Eastern, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Islamic (Arabic, Persian, and Indian), African, and European (except the Anglo-American tradition).

ENGL 348: World Literature Since 1500 (3)
Offered in spring semester
Selected works from a wide range of world literatures from about 1500 to the present: Chinese, Japanese, South Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Latin American, and European (except the Anglo-American tradition).

ENGL 350: Advanced Writing (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 Research and Writing
An intensive writing course on the history of the English language, the power of language to influence thought and behavior, gaining rhetorical sensitivity, advanced sentence grammar and effective style.

ENGL 354: Business and Professional Writing (3)
Prerequisite: Junior standing and ENGL 120, or consent of the instructor
Principles of effective argument and exposition applied to writing about business and professional topics. Emphasis on the purpose, audience and design of letters, reports and other business and professional documents.

ENGL 356: Teaching Writing and Language in Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
(10 clinical hours)
Cross Ref: EDU 356
Offered in fall semester
Theories and practices of teaching writing in middle and secondary school English language arts classrooms. Emphasis on integrating a wide range of writing activities into the classroom and on improving students' abilities as writers. Approaches to, and practice in, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening and technology skills into classroom units of instruction. Must be taken before ENGL/EDU 373 Methods of Teaching English.

ENGL 357: Topics in Writing (3)
Writing topics of a specialized nature.

ENGL 358: Advanced Creative Writing (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 210 Introduction to Creative Writing or permission of the instructor
An advanced course on writing poetry, short fiction and drama. In addition to writing their own poetry, fiction, and drama, students will read examples of classic and contemporary literature, as well as published authors on the art of writing creatively. Students will also study the process of submitting work for publication.

ENGL 359: Creative Writing Workshop (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 358 Advanced Creative Writing
An advanced workshop on writing poetry, short fiction or drama. Students will concentrate on composing a short collection of poetry, fiction or drama, develop and complete a specific reading list related to their chosen genre, attend and write about a public performance in their genre and submit their work for publication.

ENGL 360: Topics in Literature (3)
Studies of topics designed for English majors and other interested students with a background in literature.

ENGL 365: Internship (1-3)
Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing; consent of instructor
For students who perform internships and/or present an off-campus experience judged by the faculty advisor and department chair to be of significant value in English studies.

ENGL 371: Teaching Reading and Literature in Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
10 clinical hours
Offered in spring semester
Theories and practices of teaching reading in middle and secondary school English language arts classrooms. Emphasis on teaching a wide variety of texts commonly taught in middle and secondary schools (literary and non-literary, print and non-print) and on improving students' abilities as readers of those texts. Approaches to, and practice in, integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening and technology skills into classroom units of instruction. Must be taken before ENGL/EDU 373, Methods of Teaching English.

ENGL 373: Methods of Teaching English in the Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
30 Clinical Hours
Cross Ref: EDU 373
Prerequisite: ENGL 356 and 371
Offered in fall semester
Capstone course for the English education major, building on and expanding on material covered in ENGL 356 and ENGL 371. Theories and practices of teaching in middle and secondary school English language arts classrooms, with an emphasis on integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening and technology skills into effective lessons and units.

ENGL 375: Independent Study (3)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent
Offered as needed
Individual study projects for advanced students in English. Topic to be determined by instructor and student; approval of department chair required.

ENGL 395: Senior Seminar (3)
Prerequisite: Senior standing as an English major or consent of instructor
A study of literature using current methodologies, critical approaches and research techniques. Students write and present a senior paper under the supervision of a faculty member.

ENGL 396: Senior Seminar (1)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 395 in the previous semester
Revision of senior thesis supervised by the senior seminar instructor leading to the student's public presentation of the thesis in an open forum to the University community; completed e-portfolio of student's accomplishments as both an English major and a student at Saint Xavier University.

Spanish Language Skill Development

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I
An introduction to Spanish for students who have had no previous study of the language.  Class places equal emphasis on listening comprehension, oral expression and grammar.  Basic grammatical structures are presented:  verb-subject/subject-verb agreements; present tense of the indicative; adverbs and pronouns, etc.

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or placement
A second semester study of Spanish for students who have a basic knowledge of the language.  Grammatical structures presented include: preterit and imperfect tenses; the verb gustar; stem-changing verbs in the present and past tenses; por and para; past participles; present and past perfect tenses and an introduction to the uses of the subjunctive mood.  

SPAN 103: Intermediate Spanish I (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or placement
A combination of grammar review, vocabulary development with a strong oral component for students who have had two semesters of Introductory Spanish or equivalent.

SPAN 104: Intermediate Spanish II (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 103 or placement
The class is geared toward the development of particular language skills, understanding of linguistic systems, both in English and Spanish, and establishing linguistic connections outside the classroom.  Cultural topics are embedded in every activity.  We will discuss how linguistic characteristics influence our relationship with people.  Students will be required to participate in a service-learning project. 

SPAN 200: Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 104 or placement
In-depth study of syntactic and morphological structures. Practice of basic techniques of composition. Writing of expository, descriptive and narrative prose. Introduction of models from representative Spanish essays and short stories. Active writing practice with weekly compositions. Highly recommended for Spanish native speakers.

SPAN 205: Language and Culture I (3)
This course is a Web-based, intercultural project in the context of a language class, taught simultaneously at SXU and at Universidad Regional del Sur, Oaxaca, Mexico (URS).  Using the Web, students from SXU and URS will discuss cultural perceptions as well as cultural products from both countries.  The course intends to create a deeper understanding of each group's cultural attitudes, beliefs and values while developing linguistic skills.  

SPAN 206: Language and Culture II (3)
This course aims to provide an ongoing review of grammar, reading, writing and conversational practice and, at the same time, to increase the students' awareness of Hispanic culture by introducing them to some of its manifestations.  

SPAN 207-208: Spanish for the Social Services (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 104 or placement
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
This course is designed to familiarize students with the vocabulary necessary to work with Spanish-speaking communities in a variety of social-service settings.  Conversational practice in real-life situations is stressed. In addition, law enforcement terminology is introduced in the second semester.

SPAN 209: Spanish for Health and Medical Personnel (3)
Prerequisite: Some knowledge of Spanish preferable but not required
Intended to familiarize students with the specific terminology required in the health care field and allied professions.

SPAN 210: Advanced Spanish Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 104 or placement
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
This course provides students with advanced oral and written practice in a conversational setting.  Advanced Spanish vocabulary acquisition and correct pronunciation are stressed in this course.  Spanish 210 is a sixth-semester course that assumes prior knowledge of the language equal to five semesters of college instruction or its equivalency as determined by the Saint Xavier Spanish Placement Exam.  Class is conducted entirely in Spanish and students are expected to participate actively on a daily basis.  

SPAN 215-216: Business Spanish (3) 
Prerequisite: SPAN 201-202 or placement
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
First semester: Familiarizes students with the specific terminology of Spanish for business and commercial purposes. Also intended to help students develop the necessary skills for two-way translation (Spanish to English and English to Spanish). Second semester: Emphasis on the comparative understanding of commercial and economic theories and business practices in Spanish-speaking countries.

Spanish Literature and Civilization

All literature courses designated as in Spanish have a prerequisite of SPAN 200, SPAN 210, or placement.

SPAN 220: Interpretation of Texts (3)
Close reading and analysis of selected texts in prose, poetry and drama. The primary objective of the course is to familiarize students with methods of interpretative criticism and with Spanish literary terminology. In Spanish.

SPAN 231-232: Introduction to Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
Designed to acquaint students with basic characteristics and major trends of Hispanic life, culture and civilization, both in Spain and Latin America. Spanish-speaking communities in the U.S. and their impact on American society are also examined. In English.

SPAN 251-252: Individual Reading Program (1 to 3)
Designed to continue development of reading skills for both majors and non-majors.

SPAN 300: Field Work (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
For students majoring in Spanish for Social and Community Service.  An internship course designed to provide students with the opportunity of working with Spanish-speaking people.

SPAN 307: Golden Age Poetry (3)
A study of poetry as a genre and the particularities of poetry in Spanish; in-depth analysis of poets and styles of the Renaissance and Baroque periods; study of the connection between poetry and society in the 16th and 17th-centuries. Students will read critical and historical works on different aspects of the poetry studied. In Spanish.

SPAN 312: Literary Responses to Armed Conflicts in the Twentieth Century (3)
The course questions the role of literature during war and during dictatorship, the role of censorship and the role of literature as a testimony. In Spanish.

SPAN 313: Romanticism and Post Romanticism (3)
The course will study the premises of romanticism as an artistic movement and the authors and salient works of this period; it will therefore view the different ways in which prevailing ideas were incorporated, rejected or modified by each artistic production. Critical works include works on historical background and theories on romanticism in Europe, Spain and Latin America, with particular attention to historically contemporary French theorists. In Spanish.

SPAN 314: Realism and the Turn of the Century (3)
The course focuses on the development of the Spanish novel and its complexities, primarily the growing use and elaboration of numerous points of view and layers of narrative voices. The course will follow the evolution of the 19th century novel to the so-called "Generación del 98." Students will read critical works and literary manifests of the period.  In Spanish.

SPAN 315: Imaginary Caribbean: Literature of Cuba and Puerto Rico (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
The course will focus on the Caribbean as the site of the imaginary: how Europeans in the 16th-century variously conceived of the area as the site of religious Utopia as well as commercial exploitation; how Cuban and Puerto Rican authors of the 19th-century simultaneously sought to achieve independence from Spain as they articulated notions of nationhood. Finally, the course will examine Cuban-American and U.S. Puerto Rican authors of the Diaspora.  The thread binding these three disparate groups together will be the concept of la nación soñada [the dreamt nation].  In Spanish or English.

SPAN 316: Latin American Responses to Colonization (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
This course will consider and analyze the different ways in which Latin Americans have "written" a response to their colonial status, long before, and after, the countries of the continent were recognized as separate national entities. In Spanish or English.

SPAN 317: Narrative and Spectacle of the Mexican Revolution (3)
This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino Studies Program
This course will consider the artistic expression of the Mexican Revolution within its historical context. It will also analyze popular U.S. responses to the revolution through Hollywood's view of the events and of some of the best-known protagonists of the conflict.  In line with current feminist theories, the course will also examine the role of la soldadera, the female fighters of the Mexican Revolution.  In Spanish or English.

SPAN 319: Cervantes' Don Quixote (3)
The reading of Cervantes' masterpiece will be guided by a series of pivotal questions generated during the reading, including discussion of literary concepts, thematic elements, and ideas transcending the plot, such as, but not limited to: What does it mean to be a "good reader"?; Is Don Quijote a "good reader"?; What does it mean to be mad?; Is Don Quijote mad?; What is "reality" in the novel?; Is Cervantes condemning chivalric literature?; Who is the author of the novel? Besides the text of Don Quijote, reading material will include: the chivalric novel Amadís de Gaula, critical readings on parody, critical works on Don Quijote and on Cervantes' theory of the novel, a biography of Cervantes, and works on the life in Spain in the 16th century. In Spanish or English.

SPAN 334: Film and Literature (3)
This course will attempt to bridge the gap between visual narratives and textual narratives by choosing a theme and demonstrating how each kind of narrative, movies and literature, presents a point of view, deals with a creator's vision and with the limitations inherent to its form in its attempt to "tell a story." In Spanish or English.

SPAN 374: Methods of Teaching Foreign Language in Secondary Schools (3)
Cross Ref: EDU 374

SPAN 391-392: Selected Topics in Hispanic Literatures and/or Civilizations (1-3)
Study of a particular topic of interest in any period or area of Hispanic literatures and/or civilizations. Offered at the discretion of the department based on student interest and/or need. In Spanish or English.

SPAN 395: Senior Seminar (3)
Prerequisite: Senior standing as a Spanish major or consent of instructor.
A study of literature using current methodologies, critical approaches and research techniques. Student's write and present a senior paper under the supervision of a faculty member. In Spanish or English. 

Arabic

ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic I
An introduction to the language for students who have had no previous study of Arabic.  The course places equal emphasis upon aural comprehension, oral expression, reading, writing and the grammatical structures of the language.  Class features recitation, written exercises, and reading of simple texts.

ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic II (3) 
Prerequisite: ARAB 101 or placement
This course fulfills a requirement in the Middle Eastern Studies Program

A continuation of the study of Arabic for students who have had one semester of language instruction or equivalent.  Continued emphasis on aural comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing.   

ARAB 103: Intermediate Arabic I (3)
 
Prerequisite: ARAB 102 or placement
This course fulfills a requirement in the Middle Eastern Studies Program

ARAB 104: Intermediate Arabic II (3)
Prerequisite: ARAB 103 or placement
Continued development of vocabulary and idioms. Equal emphasis on both passive comprehension and active use of Arabic in its spoken and written forms.

ARAB 201-202: Advanced Composition and Conversation I and II (3)
Prerequisite: ARAB 104 or placement
An advanced course in Arabic that will focus on conversational practice and in-depth study of Arabic grammar and syntax. Emphasis will be put on intensive practice of writing in Arabic, acquisition of advanced vocabulary and pronunciation. Students will develop their conversational and writing skills by focusing on one particular aspect of the Arabic culture per semester.

French

FRNCH 101: Elementary French I
An introduction to the language for students who have had no previous study of French.  The course places equal emphasis upon aural comprehension, oral expression, reading, writing and the grammatical structures of the language.  Class features recitation. written exercises, and reading of simple texts. 

FRNCH 102: Elementary French II (3)
Prerequisite: FRNCH 101 or placement
A continuation of the study of French for students who have had one semester of language instruction or equivalent.  Continued emphasis on aural comprehension, oral expression, reading and writing.  

FRNCH 103: Intermediate French I (3)

Prerequisite: FRNCH 102 or placement

FRNCH 104: Intermediate French II (3)
Prerequisite: FRNCH 103 or placement
Continued development of vocabulary and idioms. Equal emphasis on both passive comprehension and active use of French in its spoken and written forms.

FRNCH 231-232: Introduction to French Culture and Civilization (3)
An introduction to the French culture and civilization both in France and in French-speaking countries around the world. In English.

Polish

POLSH 101: Elementary Polish I (3)
A continuation of the student of Polish for students who have had one semester of language instruction or equivalent.  Continued emphasis on aural comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing.   

POLSH 102: Elementary Polish II (3)
Prerequisite: POLSH 101 or equivalent
A continuation of the student of Polish for students who have had one semester of language instruction or equivalent.  Continued emphasis on aural comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing.   

POLSH 103: Intermediate Polish I (3)
Prerequisite: POLSH 102 or equivalent

OLSH 104: Elementary Polish II (3)
Prerequisite: POLSH 103 or equivalent
Continued development of vocabulary and idioms. Equal emphasis on both passive comprehension and active use of Polish in its spoken and written forms.

POLSH 201-202: Advanced Composition and Conversation I and II (3)
Prerequisite: POLSH 104 or placement
An advanced course in Polish that will focus on conversational practice and in-depth study of Polish grammar and syntax. Emphasis on intensive writing practice, acquisition of advanced vocabulary and pronunciation. Students will develop their conversational and writing skills by focusing on one particular aspect of the Polish culture per semester.

POLSH 261: Introduction to Polish Culture and Civilization (3)

Designed to acquaint students with basic characteristics and major trends of Polish life, culture and civilization. Students will study how Polish culture was shaped by exploring the many components that represent and influence it, such as religion, music, painting, literature and politics.  In English. 

POLSH 263: Introduction to Polish Literature (3)
An introduction to literature designed to familiarize students with major trends, periods and authors in Polish literature. Literature works will be read in translation and will include prose, poetry and drama.  In English.  

Italian

ITALN 101: Elementary Italian I (3)

ITALN 102: Elementary Italian II (3)
Prerequisite: ITALN 101 or equivalent
An introduction to the language for students who have had no previous study of Italian.  The course places equal emphasis upon aural comprehension, oral expression, reading, writing and the grammatical structures of the language.  Class features recitation, written exercises, and reading of simple texts.  

( ) = credit hours / / = classroom hours

OmniUpdate