Saint Xavier University Chicago Campus Residence Halls

Political Science


Prerequisite/Corequisite Key

P = Course must be taken previously C = Course must be taken concurrently E = Course can be taken previously or concurrently
(RQ) = Required (RM) = Recommended  

POLSC 101

Introduction to United States Government

3 credit hours

An analysis of the political structures and processes in the United States. Topics include the Constitution, parties and elections, interest group politics and public policy.

POLSC 102

World Politics

3 credit hours

Explores political processes among nations. Students explore various approaches to the study of international relations. Topics include the rise of nation-states, political development, war and peace, international political economy and international organizations.

POLSC 160

Topics in Political Science

3 credit hours

This course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Satisfies University core requirement in social sciences.

POLSC 175

First Year Seminars

3 credit hours

A seminar designed to introduce first-year students to university level academic study while fulfilling a General Education requirement in social science. Course topics vary.

POLSC 206

State and Local Government

3 credit hours

Explores Governance and policy-making at the sub-national level in the United States. Topics may include the federalism, agenda setting, budgetary politics and sub-governments. Offered fall even years.

POLSC 207

Urban Politics

3 credit hours

Contemporary and historical analysis of American urban politics. Topics will include uneven development of cities, segregation, and the concomitant development of suburbs, as well as the evolution of urban political machines. Offered fall odd years.

POLSC 208

Public Administration

3 credit hours

An introduction to concepts, ideas and issues of administrative practice in the United States. Topics will include bureaucratic organization, administrative responsiveness, and the practice and ethics of public management. Offered spring even years.

POLSC 211

International Organizations

3 credit hours

This course introduces students to theories of international cooperation and the functioning of international organizations. The course examines theories of the origin and effectiveness of international organizations and the concept of international regimes; the organization, history, and contemporary functioning of the United Nations; and explores a variety of issues addressed by international organizations-trade and finance, human rights and law, and regional development and integration and global security. Offered fall odd years.

POLSC 213

National Security Policy

3 credit hours

This course examines various theoretical approaches to national security and the institutions and actors involved in defining and implementing national security policy in the U.S. and in the international system. Students use this information to explore challenges to national security of the post-Cold War era and their implications for the conduct of American foreign policy in the contemporary international environment. Key issues may include: international terrorism and failed states, regional conflicts, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental degradation, economic security, and arms and drug trafficking. Offered fall even years.

POLSC 215

Political Parties and Elections

3 credit hours

An analysis of electoral politics and political parties in the United States. Topics may include party alignments and critical elections, party organization, representation and the role of parties in organizing government. Offered fall even years.

POLSC 216

Congress and the Presidency

3 credit hours

Explores the interaction of executive and legislative bodies in national-level policy making in the United States. Topics may include the legislative process, agenda setting, budgetary politics and policy sub-governments. Offered spring odd years.

POLSC 222

History and Politics of Welfare in America

3 credit hours

Explores the politics of welfare in the United States from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the effects of welfare policies and practices on the individual. The evolution of welfare policies will be linked to the historical changes in American society. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in U.S. history or government. Offered spring odd years.

POLSC 225

Latin American Politics

3 credit hours

This course is the study of political processes and institutions in Latin American nations. Topics may include the impact of colonialism and international dependency, state-society relations, and the sources of authoritarianism and democracy. Offered spring odd years.

POLSC 227

African Politics

3 credit hours

Explores political and social processes in sub-Saharan Africa. Topics to be covered include the legacies of colonialism, state-building, the bases of political identity, and the impact of the international economy. Offered spring even years.

POLSC 230

Regional Politics

3 credit hours

Treats politics within a world region. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

POLSC 240

Political Theory

3 credit hours

This course is an exposition and analysis of selected political philosophers. These may include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Nietzsche. Satisfies a Political Theory requirement for Political Science majors. Offered fall odd years.

POLSC 241

American Social and Political Thought

3 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) ENGL-120 or HONOR-150

Explores the central ideas of American politics from the Puritans to the present through an analysis of treatises, novels, and speeches. Satisfies a Political Theory requirement for Political Science majors. Offered fall even years.

POLSC 250

Scope and Methods Political Science

3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the methodological and conceptual questions in the discipline of political science. Topics may include definitions of political science, philosophy of the social sciences, and qualitative, quantitative and formal methodologies. This course is required of all political science majors and is a prerequisite for the Senior Seminar, POLSC 350. Offered spring. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in Political Science or consent of the instructor.

POLSC 260

Special Topics in Political Science

3 credit hours

This course focuses on special topics in political science. Course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

POLSC 261

Topics in Political Science

3 credit hours

This course focuses on special topics in political science. Course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

POLSC 262

Politics and Film

3 credit hours

Explores political theory and culture as revealed through film. Using ideological and cultural analysis of popular films, the course examines the intersection of art and politics. Offered spring even years.

POLSC 263

Politics and Superheroes

3 credit hours

The superhero narrative is a 20th century phenomenon in the United States. Coinciding with America's rise in globalism, the superhero narrative has constructed, reflected and commented on the national community in a global U.S. This course uses the superhero narrative as a venue to explore how Americans have defined themselves as a nation, as people and as a global actor over the last century. Special attention is given to issues relating to international threats, racial and gender constructions, and portrayals of national mission.

POLSC 264

Mock Trial I

3 credit hours

This course gives students the opportunity to learn the work of trial attorneys, understand the judicial system, develop critical thinking skills, and enhance communication skills. It teaches students the procedural and substantive issues and skills required to compete in the American Mock Trial Association(AMTA) annual mock trial tournaments. Students learn the modified Federal Rules of Evidence used by the ATMA and how to apply those rules to the facts of the case. Students learn effectively to articulate and argue evidence objections and responses to a judge, the structure and preparation of effective direct and cross-examination and the basic skills needed to effectively conduct witness examination. Travel required. Offered fall. Students who complete this course are expected to also complete POLSC 265 in spring semester.

POLSC 265

Mock Trial II

1 credit hour

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) POLSC-264

Students are assigned to a trial team that competes in the AMTA regional competitions. This course gives students the opportunity to continue to learn the work of trial attorneys, understand the judicial system, develop critical thinking skills, and enhance communication skills. It teaches students the procedural and substantive issues and skills required to compete in the American Mock Trial Association (AMTA) annual mock trial tournaments. Students learn the modified Federal rules of Evidence used by the AMTA, and how to apply those Rules to the facts of the case. Students learn to effectively articulate and argue evidence objections and responses to a judge, the structure and preparation of effective direct and cross-examination, and the basic skills needed to effectively conduct witness examination. Travel required. Offered spring.

POLSC 301

Public Policy Analysis

3 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) POLSC-101, POLSC-250

Examines different approaches to analyzing public policy. Policy making implementation and outcomes of policy will be addressed. Specific areas of focus may include education policy, health policy, welfare policy, or economic development policies. Offered fall even years.

POLSC 304

Special Topics in Political Science

3 credit hours

Course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

POLSC 308

American Constitutional Law

3 credit hours

Leading principles of the Constitution as seen in court decisions with special emphasis on government powers, federal-state conflicts, and the fundamental rights of individuals. Pre-requisite: 3 credit hours in U.S. history or government. Offered fall even years.

POLSC 324

Contemporary Democracy

3 credit hours

This course explores both the idea and practice of democracy in the contemporary world. Topics will include democratic theory, institutions of governance, participation, the relation of democracy and capitalism and the impact of globalization on democratic processes. Next offered spring 2019.

POLSC 334

War, Peace and Alliances

3 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) POLSC-102, POLSC-250

Explores the strategic interaction among states, focusing on international conflict. Topics covered may include theories of war, initiation, balance of power, collective security, offense-defense balance and alliance patterns. Next offered spring 2020.

POLSC 336

Global Money and Power

3 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) POLSC-102, POLSC-250

Explores the interaction of states in the areas of trade, finance and production. Topics covered may include the nature and extent of international cooperation, North-South relations and the relations between international economic policy and international security. Next offered spring 2018.

POLSC 345

African-American Political Thought

3 credit hours

Explores the thinkers treated in this course. May include Martin Delaney, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. du Bois, Marcus Garvey, James Weldon Johnson, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr. Next offered fall 2019.

POLSC 350

Senior Seminar

3 credit hours

An advanced discussion and research seminar centered upon significant problems, movements and issues. This course is the capstone of students' disciplinary training in political science. Offered fall. Prerequisite: POLSC 250, and one 300- level POLSC course, senior standing in political science or instructor's consent.

POLSC 360

Independent Study

1 to 3 credit hours

Individual readings and research for accomplished students in political science. Topic to be determined by instructor and student; approval of department chair required. Prerequisite: POLSC 250 and/or instructor's consent.

POLSC 370

Field Experience

1 to 9 credit hours

The course is for students who perform internships, work for government agencies, or present an off-campus experience judged by the faculty advisor and department chair to be of significant value in political science education. Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing; and/or instructor's consent.