Saint Xavier University Chicago Campus Residence Halls

History


Prerequisite/Corequisite Key

P = Course must be taken previously C = Course must be taken concurrently E = Course can be taken previously or concurrently
(RQ) = Required (RM) = Recommended  

HIST 101

World History to 1500

3 credit hours

The first of a two-part sequence, this course examines the development of societies and cultures from Neolithic times up to 1500. The course gives particular attention to the ways in which differing patterns of social organization have shaped the dynamic interaction between human societies and their environments.

HIST 102

World History Since 1500

3 credit hours

The second of a two-part sequence, this course examines the ongoing development of societies around the world with a particular emphasis on the increasing scale and intensity of global interaction in the period since 1500. Major topics include population growth, technological change, inter-continental migration, and the rise of a global economy.

HIST 103

United States History to 1877

3 credit hours

This course is a general survey of American social and political history from Pre-Columbian civilization through Reconstruction. It will address issues of slavery and freedom, gender, class, race, diplomacy, war, politics, economics, and culture.

HIST 104

United States History Since 1877

3 credit hours

This course is a general survey of American social and political history since the late 19th century. It will address themes of gender, class, race, politics, diplomacy, war, economics and culture.

HIST 175

First Year Seminars

3 credit hours

A seminar designed to introduce first-year students to university level academic study while fulfilling a General Education requirement in History. Course topics vary.

HIST 190

Economic Development in United States History

3 credit hours

This course is an accelerated general survey of U.S. history with an emphasis on the nation's economic development. In addition, this course will also address themes of race, class, gender, diplomacy, war, culture and politics and it will explore methods for implementing Illinois history standards in elementary and middle-school classrooms. The completion of at least 30 credit hours is required for enrollment. Students cannot receive credit for this course and HIST 103 or 104. Offered fall.

HIST 200

Introduction to Discipline of History

3 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) HIST-101, HIST-102, HIST-103, HIST-104

This course introduces department majors to the conventions and research methods of the discipline of history. The course requires students to complete a substantial research paper. Topics will vary according to instructor. Offered spring.

HIST 203

History of the Holocaust

3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the historical study of the Holocaust, and covers such topics as the development of "scientific" racism in 19th and 20th century Europe, the rise of political anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany, the creation of the camp system, and the implementation of the Final Solution. We will pay particular attention to the historical legacy of the Holocaust: how and why has it come to be seen as a benchmark for evil? In what ways has the Holocaust been memorialized? What political purposes does the Holocaust continue to serve?

HIST 204

Hiroshima and The Nuclear Age

3 credit hours

This course will address the development of atomic weapons from the Manhattan Project to Hiroshima and the development of H-bombs. Other topics are the ethical implications, proliferation, deterrence, nuclear energy, strategic doctrine, and the nuclear age impact on music and film. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in history or political science. Offered spring odd years.

HIST 208

Modern Europe, 1789-Present

3 credit hours

Survey of the history of modern Europe from the French Revolution through the early 21st century emphasizing social, cultural, economic and political developments. Also interrogates the historical notion of the "modern period" with its connotations of decisive rupture from the past and unprecedented acceleration of historical change. Offered fall even years.

HIST 211

Women in Modern European History

3 credit hours

Explores the history of women in a European context since the mid 17th century. Ideas about women, gender, and sexuality, the changing social and economic conditions of women's lives, and women's political activism will be examined. Offered every spring odd years.

HIST 213

History of Modern Germany

3 credit hours

This course concentrates on what was distinctive to the political development of modern Germany. Insofar as certain economic, social or intellectual developments affected Germany's politics, they too will be treated. The focus will be the Weimar, Nazi, and postwar period. Offered fall even years.

HIST 215

20th Century Russia

3 credit hours

This course investigates the institutional and ideological problems of Czarist Russia as it entered the 20th century and experienced World War I. It will focus on the Revolution and some of its interpretations, Lenin's legacy, the Stalinist dictatorship, World War II, the Khrushchev, Breznev and Gorbachev years. It will also consider the fall of the Soviet Empire. Offered fall odd years.

HIST 221

American Foreign Relations

3 credit hours

What are the responsibilities of global leadership and how did the United States attain such power? From Cold War to post-Cold War, the essence of America in the world will be analyzed. Historical trends, current economic and political events, differing theories of America's world role and the ethics of American diplomacy and war will be assessed. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in history. Offered fall odd years.

HIST 222

History and Politics of Welfare in America

3 credit hours

This course explores the politics of welfare in the United States from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the effects of welfare policies and practices on the individual. The evolution of welfare policies will be linked to the historical changes in American society. Offered alternate years.

HIST 223

United States and the Middle East

3 credit hours

Emergence of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict during World War I and the meaning of Zionism. U.S. diplomacy and military intervention from Truman to the 9/11 attacks and beyond. Topics include Balfour Declaration and Sykes Picot Agreement; Suez Crisis, Shi'a and Sunni divide; International Law and U.N. resolutions; Iraq and Afghanistan war and peace alternatives. The impact of the Israel Lobby on academic freedom and critical thinking on the Israel/Palestine conflict is explored.

HIST 228

African-American History

3 credit hours

This course explores the history of African-Americans from slavery to freedom, beginning with the slave trade and concluding with the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950's and 1960's through Black Lives Matter. Other topics include slave religions, abolitionism, the Harlem Renaissance, and Jim Crow apartheid. Offered fall odd years.

HIST 230

Illinois History

3 credit hours

This course explores Illinois history from its settlement by native Americans to the present. It integrates Illinois history with broader developments in American history throughout. Topics include French settlement in the 18th century, American settlement in the early 19th century, the struggle over slavery, late 19th century immigration and industrialization, 20th century African-American migration to Chicago, the Great Depression and World War II, postwar conflicts over race and housing, Chicago's political machine, and deindustrialization. Offered fall.

HIST 231

Ghetto Formation in 20th Century Chicago

3 credit hours

This course explores Chicago's 20th century urban development, with an emphasis on the creation of residential segregation through suburbanization and "inner-city" ghetto formation. A key component of the course will be an in-depth examination of the early federal housing policies that encouraged "white flight" to the Chicago suburbs--including middle-class immigrant communities and, eventually, middle class African Americans--while anchoring impoverished African Americans and other underserved populations in ill-conceived public housing complexes such as Cabrini-Green and the Robert Taylor Homes. In addition, we will examine the impact of more recent efforts at gentrification of inner-city communities. Students in this course are required to participate in a community based learning project in collaboration with the Bronzeville Historical Society. The completion of at least 30 credit hours is required for enrollment. Offered fall even years.

HIST 232

Southern Slavery, Southern Freedom

3 credit hours

This course is about slavery, freedom, and the possibilities of democracy in the U.S. It is also about the South, a region that has struggled with the meaning of democracy and freedom more than any other. We will trace this struggle from colonial Jamestown to the present, focusing on several themes that have shaped democratic possibility throughout southern history, including race, class, gender, violence and the freedom movements of Black Americans and their allies.

HIST 234

History of Colonial Latin America

3 credit hours

This course examines the history of Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonization of the Americas in the 15th through 19th centuries as well as the indigenous empires and societies that existed before contact. Topics include conquest, indigenous and African slavery and labor, religious conversion and hybridity, colonial economies, and movements toward independence. The course also focuses on the political, social, and cultural effects of the so-called "Columbian Exchange" including the impact of European diseases and animals and the creation of new social and ethnic categories. Offered fall even years.

HIST 235

Colonial America

3 credit hours

This course examines colonial American history from the pre-contact period through the American Revolution. Topics include motives for European settlement, the emergence and development of democratic political practice, capitalist transformation of the land, the impact of European settlement on indigenous populations, and the fashioning of revolutionary political ideas. Offered spring odd years.

HIST 236

Early American Republic

3 credit hours

This course examines the history of the United States from 1776 to 1820, with a special emphasis on formative political developments such as the writing and ratification of the Constitution, the creation of political parties and nascent democratization. Other topics include diplomacy and national security, westward expansion, pre-industrial manufacturing, and slavery. Offered spring even years.

HIST 240

Latin American History

3 credit hours

This course examines the development of Latin American nation-states in the 19th and 20th centuries (roughly 1800-1990s). It provides an introductory exploration of the social, economic, political and cultural history of the various countries in the region, with a specific focus on Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, and Guatemala. Topics include independence movements, liberalism, nationalism and modernity, U.S.-Latin American relations, industrialization, and Cold War military dictatorships. Offered spring.

HIST 242

History of Africa

3 credit hours

A survey of major historical themes that have shaped African life over long periods of time and across the continent. Topics include trade and migration, ecology and human adaptation, the family and sexual division of labor, colonialism and the challenges of the post-colonial period. Offered fall even years.

HIST 243

History of the Middle East

3 credit hours

A survey of the Middle East, its people, geography, cultures and history. Primary emphasis will be upon the Islamic period (7th century-present) and upon the interrelated development of religious beliefs, political and social ideologies, and cultural practices. Offered spring odd years.

HIST 244

History of East Asia

3 credit hours

This course explores the political, economic and cultural history of East Asia, especially China and Japan, and the conflicts arising from the impact of Western imperialism. Offered spring even years.

HIST 245

History of Modern Japan

3 credit hours

This course explores the history of Japan from the 16th century to the present, with a special emphasis on Japanese culture. Themes will include Western influences on modern Japan, the role of the state, the changing character of civic life, the impact of economic development on Japanese society, and tensions between individualism and conformity, social, political, economic and cultural history of modern Japan. Offered fall odd years.

HIST 247

History of Mexico

3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the major historical developments in the formation of the modern Mexican nation (1810-present), with emphasis on the construction of official national historical narratives and heroes as well as popular resistance to them. Topics include independence, 19th century wars and dictatorships, the Revolution, national identity, land and labor reform, student and popular protest, and border issues. Offered fall.

HIST 250

Topics in American History

3 credit hours

This course focuses on special topics in American history. This course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

HIST 251

Special Topics: Topics in European History

1 to 5 credit hours

This course focuses on special topics in European history. This course can be repeated when a different topic is offered.

HIST 252

Topics in Non-Western History

3 credit hours

This course focuses on special topics in Non-Western history. Course may be repeated when a different topic is offered.

HIST 253

Special Topics: History

1 to 4 credit hours

Will explore important topics of global, comparative or thematic significance. Course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

HIST 321

The Old Regime and French Revolution

3 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) HIST-102, HIST-200

This course begins with an exploration of French society in the 18th century the old regime examining the structure of society, the political process and the circulation of ideas in pre-revolutionary France. The stages of revolution from reform, to liberal revolution, to radicalization, to reaction will be explored in detail, as will the Revolution's contribution to modern politics and human rights.

HIST 348

Issues in History

3 credit hours

This course includes selected topics in history developed through analytical and interpretive readings. Course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

HIST 351

Colonial Legacy in Africa

1 to 6 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) HIST-200, 3 credit hours in History

The course examines western colonial rule in Africa and Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the legacy of colonialism in the decades since decolonization. It explores the motives behind colonization, the ways in which colonial rule altered or left unchanged pre-existing social, political, economic, and cultural structures, and the challenges that confronted new nations upon independence. The course rejects the ideological presuppositions that underpin much of the literature on "postcolonial studies" and in favor of a balanced appraisal of the positive and negative aspects of the colonial legacy. Offered spring even years.

HIST 362

Capitalism, Socialism and Social Justice

3 credit hours

Pre-requisite: P (RQ) HIST-200 and/or consent of instructor

This course examines the rise of capitalism in the late 18th century and the socialist response in the industrial revolution in the 19th century. It analyzes the theories of Smith, Marx, Engels, Sumner and Spencer. Examines the impact of these systems upon society, social class, alienation, poverty, war and peace, both historically and in contemporary society. Explores topics including health care, globalization, the nature of work and leisure, the role of government as an agent of social justice or repression, and the role of elites within the political economy of capitalist and socialist societies. Next offered in spring 2018.

HIST 370

Field Experience

3 credit hours

The course is for students who perform internships, work for government agencies, archives, museums, libraries and historical societies, or present an off-campus experience judged by the faculty advisor and department chair to be of significant value in history education. Junior/senior standing and instructor's consent.

HIST 395

Senior Seminar

3 credit hours

This course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate, refine and consolidate knowledge of skills and content acquired during their previous years of study. It is a collaborative as well as a culminating learning experience that permits students to pursue individual research projects and submit them to their peers. The seminar will center upon a topic to be determined by the instructor. Offered fall. Prerequisite: HIST 200 plus one 300-level HIST course and senior standing in history or history education.