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Meet Our Faculty and Staff

Michael Clark, Ph.D.

Department Chair and Associate Professor of Political Science
Email: clark@sxu.edu

Area of Specialization

American Government; Urban Politics; Public Administration; Public Policy Analysis; African-American Politics and Education

Biography

It seems to me that the real political task in a society such as ours is to criticize the workings of institutions which appear to be both neutral and independent; to criticize them in such a manner that the political violence which has always exercised itself obscurely through them will be unmasked, so that one can fight them.    
-Michel Foucault

Michael Clark was born and raised in Brentwood, a suburb of St. Louis, MO. He earned an M. Ed. (1975) in educational administration and a Ph.D. (1996) in political science from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Along the way he acquired a teaching license (1973) as well as a secondary administrative certification (1975). His areas of specialization are American government, urban politics, policy analysis, public administration, and African-American politics.

Prior to him becoming a faculty member at Saint Xavier he spent time in the retail and banking industries. His previous business experiences include several different assignments: Trainer, Assistant Store Manager, Department Store Manager, Operation Assistant, and Teller Supervisor. These experiences provide a practical stage for relating theory (education) to practice (work).

Dr. Clark has taught at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and Florissant Community College. He joined the faculty of Saint Xavier University in 1996 as an assistant professor. He created and served as director of the African-American Studies Program from 2003 to 2007. Currently, Dr. Clark serves as the chair of the Department of History and Political Science. His work has reflected his devotion to being an effective teacher, a lifelong learner/scholar and active member of all aspects of the university community.

His current research focus is on genealogical and archaeological investigations of African-American status (as reflected in practices) in the United States to reveal how the discourses of color, race and culture have been used to empower institutions to create and maintain the white/black binary (power relations/group domination) despite efforts of resistance.

Courses Offered

Selected Honors